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Cute Babies Of Instagram

Cute Babies Of Instagram

It’s no secret that babies are cute. In fact, they’re so cute that parents create Instagram accounts for their beloved little ones so the rest of the world can look in awe. We’ve gathered some of the most adorable child-focused Instagram accounts that we love for you to marvel at (and of course, undoubtedly follow). So, forget #RKOI, it’s all about #CBOI!

Quick Twin Tips For Parents-To-Be

Quick Twin Tips For Parents-To-Be

Twin babies having fun on a studio white floor

Congratulations! Instead of the traditional one bun in the oven, you’re expecting a pair. Yes, it’s overwhelming. Yes, it’s a tad bit scary. But you just hit the parenting lotto! Now if you could only hit the real lotto to pay for those college tuitions, we’d be all set.

I want to introduce myself. I’m Natalie Diaz, founder of Twiniversity.com and author of What To Do When You’re Having Two, the bestselling book for expectant twin parents. What? You don’t have a copy? No worries! I’m going to give you some quick tips today and you can Google me later. For now…on with the tips!

Stay Positive:

A twin pregnancy has a lot more challenges than a singleton pregnancy and often has some additional bumps in the road. Stay on top of the bumps and ask plenty of questions at your doctors’ appointments so you’re always on top of things. A support network is key, so connecting to your local twins club is a must (and if you don’t have a local twins club, you have us here at Twiniversity). Having real twin parents to talk to who’ve been there and done that will help ease your fears on what twin parents consider “normal” when it comes to pregnancy. I’ll warn you now, you’ll have more doctor’s appointments, more ultrasounds, and more tests than an expectant singleton family, but realize that most of it is totally typical in a multiple birth, so don’t get worried.

Start Shopping:

With the average twin pregnancy lasting around 36 weeks, you won’t have as much time to prepare as your friends who are expecting one. Do your homework on strollers, car seats, cribs, mattresses and more. Twiniversity’s expecting twins classes were made to help you prepare, and a full suggested registry list can be found in my book as well. Start with a realistic budget and try to stay within it. Often folks think that twins are double the cost, and while that can be true, there are A lot of ways to save, including buying from companies with Multiple Birth Discount programs. Did you know that many major retailers offer a discount to twin families for buying two of the same large item, such as cribs and car seats? Yup! It’s true.

Get Ready to Play 20 Questions:

When your friends, family, and even strangers find out you’re expecting two, get ready for the questions! They will want to know if they are girls or boys, if you’re planning to deliver vaginally or via C-section, and more. After the birth, people will always ask: “Who was first?” and they will ask you if your clearly fraternal boy/girl twins are “identical” (that one is my personal favorite). When people see twins, they lose their natural socially acceptable filter and start asking some deeply personal questions. Don’t be shocked to hear from a stranger on the bus: “Whose sperm did you use?” “Where did you get the eggs?” and more. Yup, it’s going to be a wild ride.

Celebrate:

When we first found out there was a second heartbeat, my husband’s first words were: “We have to move!” Literally. I’m not joking. It was hard to celebrate the awesomeness of our twin pregnancy when our minds were racing 10 steps ahead. We were thinking about living arrangements, finances, our car, and even our dog. We were thinking that everything would have to change, and wondering if we could even handle it. It took us a while to step back and celebrate with our friends and family and toast our joyful expectant delivery. Everything did fall into place. We did eventually step back and take a breath, but I had wished we did it sooner.

These are just some quick tips to get you on your way. If you don’t have it yet, I strongly recommend you get our book and check out a local in-person class if you’re in NYC or Chicago, or an online class anywhere else in the world. Cheers to you and your upcoming bundles of joy!

Natalie Diaz is the founder of Twiniversity—the world’s leading twin resource and support network for parents of twins or more—which offers a selection of classes and resources. She is also the author of What To Do When You’re Having Two: The Twins Survival Guide From Pregnancy Through the First Year.

 

All Baby Everything

All Baby Everything

New York Family has very special and helpful resources for expectant and new parents (with children up to toddler age).

The New York Baby Show: The New York Baby Show is a wonderful family-friendly mega-event for expectant and new parents (and their babies and toddlers) from New York City, the Tri-State area, and beyond. Explore a mix of top products and services for maternity, baby, and toddler. Sample an inspiring line up of speakers and demonstrations from highly regarded and beloved figures in the world of parenting and pregnancy. Make discoveries, get your questions answered, feel supported and informed, win great raffles, and best of all…enjoy yourself!

Our Weekly Baby Newsletter: We also offer expectant and new parents a wonderful and free weekly e-newsletter filled with info on pre- and post-natal resources, shopping tips, news, and musings—not to mention fabulous giveaways.

Finally, the following directory should also help address many of your needs as a new parent.

Gear

5 Lessons For Your Second Pregnancy

5 Lessons For Your Second Pregnancy

Portrait of young pregnant attractive woman, standing by the window, dressed in casual clothing, day before due date

When I found out I was expecting a second child I almost couldn’t believe it. It was the day before my husband and I were throwing a New Year’s Eve party at our house and I was sure the at-home pregnancy test would read negative. My husband and I always wanted multiple children, but after a miscarriage last winter and nearly a year of trying without any luck, I thought secondary infertility might be the hand we were dealt. I had no pregnancy symptoms that raw December morning and didn’t want to deal with the disappointment of another negative test, but I figured I’d take it just to make sure. I was planning on enjoying my share of champagne, wine, and cured meats the next evening to help ease some of the holiday-induced stress. As luck would have it though, I found myself sipping sparkling water and suppressing a pregnancy-induced smile throughout the party.

This pregnancy started out much like the first, with equal parts disbelief and joy coursing their way through my body as I tried to wrap my mind around the idea that I was growing a poppy seed-sized embryo. But within a few short weeks, I quickly realized this pregnancy would be very different. Here’s what I learned from the first time around and what I’m doing differently.

1. I refuse to freak out about toxins.

Yes, toxic chemicals are real and they’re scary, but there’s so much noise about toxins being in everything from drinking water to furniture that I risk driving myself crazy trying to avoid them all. During my first pregnancy, I wouldn’t even go out in the sun because I was worried about potential baby-harming ingredients in sunscreen. This time around, I know to steer clear of things with retinoids, tetracycline, parabens, phthalates, and salicylic acid, and I’m leaving it at that.

2. I’m not buying anything.

As I learned with my first baby, people will practically trip over themselves to give you hand-me-downs and gifts, especially relatives and friends with young children. As a result I had close to 25 newborn onesies, and some of them my daughter outgrew before she could even wear them. So I plan on doing zero shopping before this baby arrives.

3. I’m signing up for prenatal yoga.

Self-care. The mere idea of it makes me feel funny. Put myself first? Why would I do that?! It doesn’t come naturally to many women. But if there’s any time to prioritize it, it’s when you’re expecting. During my first pregnancy, I thought walking my dog three times a day was good enough exercise and time to clear my mind. But while getting fresh air and sunlight with a furry friend has its benefits, it pales in comparison to the experience of attending a prenatal yoga class. The camaraderie you can build with other women in the same life situation is beyond description. Imagine being about to embark upon the most wild ride of your life, and having nine new friends to do that with? It’s almost priceless.

4. I won’t fight the “wisdom” of family and friends.

When I was pregnant with my daughter, I became so sick and tired of people telling me what to do that I started pushing back. If a relative told me I shouldn’t “be a hero” by trying to give birth without any medical interventions, I would lash out with statistics about fetal monitoring, epidural risks, and C-section incidences. Now that I’m expecting my second child, I plan to just smile and nod, and maybe try to change the subject when someone offers a nugget of wisdom. There’s no point in going to the mat with well-intentioned friends and family.

5. I’m wearing a bathing suit.

When I was pregnant with my first summer baby, I flat-out refused to slather myself with sunscreen and squeeze into a swimsuit. This time, I have no choice, being that I’m in charge of a toddler who wants desperately to swim and needs close supervision. So I bought a super-cute maternity swimsuit and plan on rocking it from June to September.

For all I know, this could be the last time I’m pregnant. So I fully plan on soaking up all the prenatal poses and pool time I can before Labor Day (and my labor day) comes.

Whitney C. Harris is a freelance writer living in Westchester, NY, with her husband and young daughter. Find her at whitneycharris.com.

What To Eat (Or Avoid) When You’re Pregnant

What To Eat (Or Avoid) When You’re Pregnant

Beautiful pregnant woman eating ice cream

When it comes to food, there’s no limit to what pregnant and breastfeeding mothers have to consider. After all, anything you ingest has a chance—if not certainty—of affecting your baby. We spoke with a few experts to learn more about what you should and shouldn’t consume while pregnant and while breastfeeding.

Pregnancy

In pregnancy, everything you eat and drink—yes, everything—affects the fetus. “You want to make sure that you’re taking in an extra 300 calories a day and that you’re seeing your OB-GYN regularly for checkups and to monitor your weight gain,” says pediatrician, author, and mom-of-three Dr. Tanya Altmann.

Additionally, according to Altmann, avoiding certain foods will not decrease the chance that your child will develop food allergies. “In fact, we think that exposing your babies to all allergic-type foods through pregnancy and breastfeeding may even be beneficial and decrease the chance that your child will develop allergies later on in life,” she explains.

Of course, there are still plenty of foods that should be avoided: Alcohol is always a no—despite many protests of “one glass of wine a night”—and soft cheeses, mercury-heavy fish, and all things artificial (sweeteners and otherwise) are best left off the plate. “If there was ever a time to really be as conscious and as knowledgeable and as cautious as you could, it’s while you’re pregnant,” says breastfeeding expert and founder of My Baby Experts Shari Criso.

Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding is far less strict in terms of the mother’s diet. Altmann doesn’t advocate for mothers adjusting their diet, because “most babies will get used to whatever nutrition is in their breastmilk and whatever moms eat on a regular basis.” Plus, she adds: “You want to make sure that mom’s getting the nutrition; you don’t want her going on a totally restricted diet unless it’s really, really needed.” While mothers often worry about losing weight after giving birth, breastfeeding itself burns 500 calories daily: Undereating will make it harder to feed your baby and stay healthy!

Molly Petersen, a certified lactation consultant (CLC) at Lansinoh, adds: “There aren’t any specific foods that all moms should avoid, so go ahead and enjoy that sushi or medium rare steak that you’ve been missing while you were pregnant.” You also can occasionally enjoy a drink now and again, as long as you aren’t going to be pumping again for a few hours. But what foods might pose an issue?

Usually, according to Altmann, what causes gas in the mother may likely cause gas in the baby: Foods like broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, and other cruciferous vegetables. All the same, it’s very much dose-dependent; if you don’t eat too much of a given gas-inducing food, it shouldn’t have much of an effect. Caffeine is similar: One cup of coffee should be just fine, and just be sure to monitor your baby’s reaction—if they’re fussy when you have caffeine, you may need to cut back.

“You could have a very imperfect diet and your baby’s still going to get everything the baby needs, it kind of takes from your body,” Crisco notes. As far as breastmilk supply goes, Petersen says that “the best way to maintain a healthy breastmilk supply is to feed your baby based on hunger cues. This way your baby is telling your body exactly how much milk they need to grow.”

What To Eat (Or Avoid) When You’re Pregnant

Beautiful pregnant woman eating ice cream

When it comes to food, there’s no limit to what pregnant and breastfeeding mothers have to consider. After all, anything you ingest has a chance—if not certainty—of affecting your baby. We spoke with a few experts to learn more about what you should and shouldn’t consume while pregnant and while breastfeeding.

Pregnancy

In pregnancy, everything you eat and drink—yes, everything—affects the fetus. “You want to make sure that you’re taking in an extra 300 calories a day and that you’re seeing your OB-GYN regularly for checkups and to monitor your weight gain,” says pediatrician, author, and mom-of-three Dr. Tanya Altmann.

Additionally, according to Altmann, avoiding certain foods will not decrease the chance that your child will develop food allergies. “In fact, we think that exposing your babies to all allergic-type foods through pregnancy and breastfeeding may even be beneficial and decrease the chance that your child will develop allergies later on in life,” she explains.

Of course, there are still plenty of foods that should be avoided: Alcohol is always a no—despite many protests of “one glass of wine a night”—and soft cheeses, mercury-heavy fish, and all things artificial (sweeteners and otherwise) are best left off the plate. “If there was ever a time to really be as conscious and as knowledgeable and as cautious as you could, it’s while you’re pregnant,” says breastfeeding expert and founder of My Baby Experts Shari Criso.

Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding is far less strict in terms of the mother’s diet. Altmann doesn’t advocate for mothers adjusting their diet, because “most babies will get used to whatever nutrition is in their breastmilk and whatever moms eat on a regular basis.” Plus, she adds: “You want to make sure that mom’s getting the nutrition; you don’t want her going on a totally restricted diet unless it’s really, really needed.” While mothers often worry about losing weight after giving birth, breastfeeding itself burns 500 calories daily: Undereating will make it harder to feed your baby and stay healthy!

Molly Petersen, a certified lactation consultant (CLC) at Lansinoh, adds: “There aren’t any specific foods that all moms should avoid, so go ahead and enjoy that sushi or medium rare steak that you’ve been missing while you were pregnant.” You also can occasionally enjoy a drink now and again, as long as you aren’t going to be pumping again for a few hours. But what foods might pose an issue?

Usually, according to Altmann, what causes gas in the mother may likely cause gas in the baby: Foods like broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, and other cruciferous vegetables. All the same, it’s very much dose-dependent; if you don’t eat too much of a given gas-inducing food, it shouldn’t have much of an effect. Caffeine is similar: One cup of coffee should be just fine, and just be sure to monitor your baby’s reaction—if they’re fussy when you have caffeine, you may need to cut back.

“You could have a very imperfect diet and your baby’s still going to get everything the baby needs, it kind of takes from your body,” Crisco notes. As far as breastmilk supply goes, Petersen says that “the best way to maintain a healthy breastmilk supply is to feed your baby based on hunger cues. This way your baby is telling your body exactly how much milk they need to grow.”

What To Eat (Or Avoid) When You’re Pregnant

Beautiful pregnant woman eating ice cream

When it comes to food, there’s no limit to what pregnant and breastfeeding mothers have to consider. After all, anything you ingest has a chance—if not certainty—of affecting your baby. We spoke with a few experts to learn more about what you should and shouldn’t consume while pregnant and while breastfeeding.

Pregnancy

In pregnancy, everything you eat and drink—yes, everything—affects the fetus. “You want to make sure that you’re taking in an extra 300 calories a day and that you’re seeing your OB-GYN regularly for checkups and to monitor your weight gain,” says pediatrician, author, and mom-of-three Dr. Tanya Altmann.

Additionally, according to Altmann, avoiding certain foods will not decrease the chance that your child will develop food allergies. “In fact, we think that exposing your babies to all allergic-type foods through pregnancy and breastfeeding may even be beneficial and decrease the chance that your child will develop allergies later on in life,” she explains.

Of course, there are still plenty of foods that should be avoided: Alcohol is always a no—despite many protests of “one glass of wine a night”—and soft cheeses, mercury-heavy fish, and all things artificial (sweeteners and otherwise) are best left off the plate. “If there was ever a time to really be as conscious and as knowledgeable and as cautious as you could, it’s while you’re pregnant,” says breastfeeding expert and founder of My Baby Experts Shari Criso.

Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding is far less strict in terms of the mother’s diet. Altmann doesn’t advocate for mothers adjusting their diet, because “most babies will get used to whatever nutrition is in their breastmilk and whatever moms eat on a regular basis.” Plus, she adds: “You want to make sure that mom’s getting the nutrition; you don’t want her going on a totally restricted diet unless it’s really, really needed.” While mothers often worry about losing weight after giving birth, breastfeeding itself burns 500 calories daily: Undereating will make it harder to feed your baby and stay healthy!

Molly Petersen, a certified lactation consultant (CLC) at Lansinoh, adds: “There aren’t any specific foods that all moms should avoid, so go ahead and enjoy that sushi or medium rare steak that you’ve been missing while you were pregnant.” You also can occasionally enjoy a drink now and again, as long as you aren’t going to be pumping again for a few hours. But what foods might pose an issue?

Usually, according to Altmann, what causes gas in the mother may likely cause gas in the baby: Foods like broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, and other cruciferous vegetables. All the same, it’s very much dose-dependent; if you don’t eat too much of a given gas-inducing food, it shouldn’t have much of an effect. Caffeine is similar: One cup of coffee should be just fine, and just be sure to monitor your baby’s reaction—if they’re fussy when you have caffeine, you may need to cut back.

“You could have a very imperfect diet and your baby’s still going to get everything the baby needs, it kind of takes from your body,” Crisco notes. As far as breastmilk supply goes, Petersen says that “the best way to maintain a healthy breastmilk supply is to feed your baby based on hunger cues. This way your baby is telling your body exactly how much milk they need to grow.”

Chic Summer Maternity Style

Chic Summer Maternity Style

Summer is coming–which means, if you’re expecting, it’s time to stock up on style-savvy summer maternity looks! We’ve rounded up the chicest maternity pieces to showcase the season’s top fashion trends, as well as great accessories for every look. Prepare for your most stylish summer ever!

City Chic

pregnant woman wearing jumpsuit

HATCH Collection Wraparound Jumper, $258, hatchcollection.com

maternity clothing accessories

Clockwise from top left: boob The Shirt Maternity and Nursing Top, in Tofu with Print, $69, boobdesign.com; Skip Hop Greenwich Simply Chic Backpack, $100, skiphop.com; and ShoeTherapy Python Loafers from Seraphine, $68, seraphine.com

Beach Babe

pregnant woman in striped swimsuit

Striped Maternity One Piece Swimsuit from A Pea In The Pod, $98, destinationmaternity.com

pregnant woman in tropical dress

Envie de Frais Bella Perroquet Dress, $140, enviedefraise.com

summer maternity accessories

Clockwise from left: Jonathan Adler Versailles Studs Beach Towel, $98, jonathanadler.com; Poolside Bags – Custom Long Leather Handle, $250, wearepoolside.com; Brother Vellies Golden Stripe Burkina Slide, $285, brothervellies.com

Bohemian Luxury

pregnant woman in pink maternity dress

Pink Blush Magenta Floral Ruffle Open Shoulder Maternity Maxi Dress, $68, pinkblushmaternity.com

bohemian maternity accessories

Clockwise from left: Seraphine LOVE Denim Maternity Jacket, $99, seraphine.com; Lucky Brand Blythh Slide, $79, luckybrand.com; Rebecca Minkoff Geo Tassel Chandeliers, $48, rebeccaminkoff.com

Nautical Mama

pregnant woman in nautical maternity outfit

GeBe Larry T-Shirt, $30, and Anny Skirt, $55, gebematernity.com

nautical maternity accessories

Clockwise from left: Sea Bags Navy Anchor Diaper Bag, $190, seabags.com; Kiel James Patrick Anchor Atlantic Pearl Bracelet with Mom-O-Gram Charm, $88, kieljamespatrick.com; KEDS X kate spade new york CHAMPION, $75, keds.com

Why Covering Your Stroller with a Blanket Is Dangerous

Why Covering Your Stroller with a Blanket Is Dangerous

In the blazing summer heat with the full sun bearing down on us, countless parents and caregivers drape a blanket over their stroller to give babies shade. It turns out, while we think we are protecting our little ones from the sun, we may be putting them at risk for heatstroke and SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome).

Based on an interview with Stockholm pediatrician Dr. Svante Norgren about the dangers of covering a stroller, the Swedish newspaper, Svenska Dagbladet, conducted an experiment by putting a stroller out in the sun, midday, in the summer. Without a cover, the stroller was about 72 degrees Fahrenheit. After covering the stroller with a thin cover for 30 minutes, the temperature rose to 93 degrees, and after an hour, 100 degrees!

Because babies sweat less, they are not able to adjust their body temperature as easily, compared to adults and older children. Their body temperatures can rise 3-5 times faster than ours. According to SIDS Australia, “Thermal stress (overheating) has been implicated in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) for many years and avoiding overheating has been one of the strategies to reduce the risk of SIDS.”

So how can you keep infants cool, safely? Staying indoors during the peak heat of the day (between 10am and 3pm) can be helpful. If you must head outdoors, use a UV cover that doesn’t enclose the stroller, like a parasol. Look for strollers with large sun canopies, ventilated or removable back panel, and no excess cushioning. Air circulation is critical. Wide-brimmed hats are also a good way to protect them from the sun. Dress children lightly, use plenty of sunscreen, and keep them well-hydrated. Sponge your child with a damp cloth to keep them comfortable. A small clip-on fan can be attached to their stroller for added circulation – just be sure to keep it out of reach.

When in their stroller, check your baby frequently to ensure they are not overheated. An overheated baby may sleep a lot. Ensure they are not sweating or are hot to the touch and head indoors if the sun and heat get too strong.

Jennifer Beall Saxton is the founder and CEO of Tot Squad, trusted partner of retailers, stroller, and car seat brands that offers car seat installation, baby gear cleaning and stroller repair. With aspirations of becoming the “Geek Squad” of the baby world, Tot Squad has operations in Los Angeles, San Diego, New York City, and Washington DC, and is expanding nationally. Jennifer has been a CPST since 2009. For more information on Tot Squad, visit totsquad.com.

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